Tuesday, 18 November 2008

The History and Antiquities of the Church and Parish of St. Laurence

Sorry about the delay getting this one in print, it wasn’t an easy one, anyway it’s out today at £9.99 I haven’t yet set up a buy it now button so if you want a copy posted to you, you will need to email the bookshop michaelsbookshop@aol.com I am having a few technical problems at the moment, but will endeavour to keep up with demand.

The full title is; The History and Antiquities of the Church and Parish of St. Laurence, Thanet, in the County of Kent. With Special Articles upon Local Subjects by other Contributors. Illustrated with Maps, & pedigrees, Lithographs & Zincographs from Photographs specially taken for the work. 1895 By Charles Cotton.

The original edition is a rather large book so the print in my reprint is very small, I recommend a visit to the pound shop for a magnifying glass.

It’s one of the most important local history books, it mostly concentrates on history of St Lawrence before 1850 so is more of a historians book than a light read which should please a lot of people I believe.

I don’t have any biographical information on Cotton, so if anyone knows anything about him please let me know.

2 comments:

  1. Could this be the man? anyone with access to Arch. Cant. should be able to check his obit.

    Dr Charles Cotton
    (1856–1939)
    Honorary Deputy Librarian, Canterbury Cathedral
    (1919–1939)
    Charles Cotton OBE, FRSP(E), MRCS was a medical man who spend most of his professional career in Ramsgate (Physician to St Barnabas Convalescent Home, then Senior Physician at Ramsgate General Hospital). He retired in 1914 and m0oved to Canterbury where he was able to devote himself to archaeological and archival studies. He published many transcriptions and translations of documents from the Cathedral Arechives or relating to the Cathedral.

    An obituary of Dr Cotton can be found in Archaeologia Cantiana, 51 (1940 for 1939), 232–4. His work at the Cathedral Library is discussed by Nigel Ramsay, 'The Cathedral Archives and Library' in: A History of Canterbury Cathedral, ed. P. Collinson, N. Ramsay, M. Sparks. (OUP 1995, revised edition 2002), 402–3.

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  2. 12.46 thanks for that, cross-referencing shows that it is indeed the right man, it leaves me in a bit of a spot too as I shouldn’t really be publishing it until next year, my previous research had his date of death down as 1938.

    I have decided that as I have already sold several copies I am guilty already, so will keep it in print, if the copyright holder comes forward they are welcome to the royalties.

    ReplyDelete

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